Neenah Volunteer is Deployed to FL for Disaster Relief

By Lauren Lindstrom, Communications Intern, American Red Cross:

When disaster strikes, Harvey Lorenz is ready to take the call. The American Red Cross Northeast Wisconsin Chapter volunteer and Neenah, Wis., resident will deploy to Tallahassee, Fla. on June 29 to serve as a Financial and Statistical Supervisor for flooding cleanup efforts following Tropical Depression Debby.

This will be the eighth service deployment for Lorenz, who most recently traveled to Pennsylvania in September 2011 to assist with the aftermath of Hurricane Irene.

For Lorenz, it is the pull of service and the quality of the organization that keeps him coming back. He wants to put his years of expertise in the financial industry to a good use.

“I like working with numbers, which is not a gift for everyone,” Lorenz said. “I feel like I can use my expertise here.”

“The Red Cross is fabulous,” he added. “It’s a great group to be a team member of.”

Harvey fills out paperwork in preparation for his deployment to Florida.

It is this group he will join to assist those suffering from the effects of Debby.“We do what we can to lighten their load and make their lives less traumatic,” he said.

The American Red Cross is providing critical help to thousands of people affected by massive flooding in Florida from Tropical Depression Debby.

Nearly 200 Red Cross disaster workers are helping in Florida, where 11 shelters were open overnight. Tropical Depression Debby has dumped as much as ten inches of rain on most of the state, with some areas getting up to 25 inches of rain. Truckloads of additional relief supplies are on the way to Florida and 20 response vehicles are ready to start distributing items to help as the cleanup begins there.

“Thousands have been impacted by these disasters and the Red Cross is giving them a safe place to stay, food to eat and a shoulder to lean on,” said Charley Shimanski, senior vice president, Red Cross Disaster Services. “We are expanding our efforts to help the growing number of people affected by the fires in the west and are ready to distribute the tools and other resources people will need to begin the cleanup in Florida as the flood waters recede.”

HOW PEOPLE CAN HELP Those who want to help can make a donation to support American Red Cross Disaster Relief by visiting www.redcross.org or calling 1-800-RED-CROSS. People can also text REDCROSS to 90999 to make a $10 donation. Contributions may also be sent to local American Red Cross chapters or to the American Red Cross, P.O. Box 37243,Washington, DC 20013.

REGISTER ON SAFE AND WELL The Red Cross Safe and Well website is also available. People affected by the fires and flooding can access the site and let loved ones know where they are. There are several ways to register on Safe and Well, or search for a loved one. From a computer, visit redcross.org from a smart phone, visit www.redcross.org/safeandwell  or call 1-800-RED CROSS (1-800-733-2767) to be connected with one’s local Red Cross chapter.

About the American Red Cross:

The American Red Cross shelters, feeds and provides emotional support to victims of disasters; supplies more than 40 percent of the nation’s blood; teaches skills that save lives; provides international humanitarian aid; and supports military members and their families. The Red Cross is a not-for-profit organization that depends on volunteers and the generosity of the American public to perform its mission. For more information, please visit redcross.org or join our blog at http://blog.redcross.org.

Youth Empowered by American Red Cross Summer Program

Youth partners play an important role in helping ensure a stable blood supply

During the lazy days of summer, schools are out of session, yet local young adults are staying very active. In fact, 16- to 24-year-olds throughout the Oshkosh community are changing lives by partnering with the American Red Cross. 

Live. Give. Life. is a Red Cross program to engage 16- to 24-year-olds to organize blood drives and recruit their peers to give blood during the summer. The program provides an opportunity for youth to experience social responsibility and learn the importance of community service while playing an active role in maintaining a stable blood supply.

 WHAT:          Live. Give. Life. Blood Donation Opportunities

WHO:            Yee Lor, Youth blood drive coordinator               

                           American Red Cross staff

WHEN:         Friday, June 29 from 11:00 a.m. to 4 p.m.

WHERE:      American Red Cross Office (Tower West Building); 540 W. Washburn Street,Oshkosh.

Live. Give. Life.  is also rewarding. All presenting blood donors at these special youth blood drives scheduled between June 1 and August 31, 2012 will receive a tangle free ear bud code-card with a unique PIN number that can be entered online for a chance to win prizes. Additionally, high schools that host summer blood drives will earn an additional $500 for their school’s 2012-2013 Red Cross Young Minds Change Lives scholarship.

Young donors play an important role in meeting patient needs for blood products. Approximately 20 percent of blood donations come from high school and college blood drives during the academic year. During the summer when school is not in session, donations from high school and college donors drop by as much as 57 percent.

The Red Cross blood supply has reached emergency levels with 50,000 fewer donations than expected in June. All eligible blood donors are encouraged to roll up a sleeve and give as soon as possible. All blood types are needed, but especially O positive, O negative, B negative and A negative in order to meet patient demand this summer.

How to Donate Blood

Simply call 1-800-RED CROSS (1-800-733-2767) or visit redcrossblood.org to make an appointment or for more information. All blood types are needed to ensure a reliable supply for patients. A blood donor card or driver’s license, or two other forms of identification are required at check-in.  Individuals who are 17 years of age (16 with parental permission in some states), weigh at least 110 pounds and are generally in good health may be eligible to donate blood. High school students and other donors 18 years of age and younger also have to meet certain height and weight requirements. 

About the American Red Cross

The American Red Cross shelters, feeds and provides emotional support to victims of disasters; supplies more than 40 percent of the nation’s blood; teaches skills that save lives; provides international humanitarian aid; and supports military members and their families. The Red Cross is a not-for-profit organization that depends on volunteers and the generosity of the American public to perform its mission. For more information, please visit redcross.org or join our blog at http://blog.redcross.org.

 

Red Cross Helping Thousands Affected by Wildfires in the West, Flooding in Florida

Cheyenne Mountain High School Shelter, Colorado Springs, CO Photo Credit: Catherine Barde/American Red Cross

WASHINGTON, Wednesday, June 27, 2012 — The American Red Cross is providing critical help to thousands of people affected by the raging wildfires in the west and the massive flooding in Florida from Tropical Depression Debby.

Ten Red Cross shelters were open Tuesday night in Colorado, Utah and Montana where several wildfires are burning out of control. In Colorado, nearly 300 trained Red Cross disaster workers are supporting relief efforts where the fires are threatening as many as 20,000 homes.

Nearly 200 Red Cross disaster workers are helping in Florida, where 11 shelters were open overnight. Tropical Depression Debby has dumped as much as ten inches of rain on most of the state, with some areas getting up to 25 inches of rain. Truckloads of additional relief supplies are on the way to Florida and 20 response vehicles are ready to start distributing items to help as the clean-up begins there.

Red Cross workers have served more than 32,000 meals and snacks to people affected by the wildfires and flooding, have made almost 3,300 health and mental health contacts, and distributed more than 4,300 relief items.

“Thousands have been impacted by these disasters and the Red Cross is giving them a safe place to stay, food to eat and a shoulder to lean on,” said Charley Shimanski, senior vice president, Red Cross Disaster Services. “We are expanding our efforts to help the growing number of people affected by the fires in the west and are ready to distribute the tools and other resources people will need to begin the clean-up in Florida as the flood waters recede.”

HOW PEOPLE CAN HELP Those who want to help can make a donation to support American Red Cross Disaster Relief by visiting www.redcross.org or calling 1-800-RED-CROSS. People can also text REDCROSS to 90999 to make a $10 donation. Contributions may also be sent to local American Red Cross chapters or to the American Red Cross, P.O. Box 37243,Washington, DC 20013.

HOW TO FIND RED CROSS SHELTERS People who have been forced to evacuate can find out where Red Cross shelters are open by going to www.redcross.org or accessing the free Red Cross phone app. Both are refreshed with updated information every 30 minutes. Residents can also monitor local media—radio, newspaper and television—to find out where local shelters are located.

REGISTER ON SAFE AND WELL The Red Cross Safe and Well website is also available. People affected by the fires and flooding can access the site and let loved ones know where they are. There are several ways to register on Safe and Well, or search for a loved one. From a computer, visit redcross.org; from a smart phone, visit www.redcross.org/safeandwell or call 1-800-RED CROSS (1-800-733-2767) to be connected with one’s local Red Cross chapter.

About the American Red Cross:
The American Red Cross shelters, feeds and provides emotional support to victims of disasters; supplies more than 40 percent of the nation’s blood; teaches skills that save lives; provides international humanitarian aid; and supports military members and their families. The Red Cross is a not-for-profit organization that depends on volunteers and the generosity of the American public to perform its mission. For more information, please visit redcross.org or join our blog at http://blog.redcross.org.

Staying Safe When Lightning Strikes; Lightning Safety Awareness Week June 24-30, 2012

Information provided by: Wisconsin Emergency Managment

Each year more than 400 people are struck by lightning in the United States. An average of 54 people are killed and hundreds of others suffer lifelong pain and permanent neurological disabilities. In Wisconsin we have had 23 lightning deaths since 1982 (see map).

You can protect yourself and your family by knowing these simple lightning safety facts and tips:

If you hear thunder, you are in danger. Don’t be fooled by blue skies. If you hear thunder, lightning is close enough to pose an immediate threat. Remember: When Thunder Roars…Go Indoors!

  • A fully enclosed building with wiring and plumbing offers the best protection. Sheds, picnic shelters and covered porches DO NOT protect you from lightning.
  • If a building is not available get into a hard-topped metal vehicle and close all the windows.
  • Stay inside a safe building or vehicle for at least 30 minutes after you hear the last clap of thunder.
  • Don’t use a corded phone except in an emergency. Cordless and cell phones are safe to use.
  • Keep away from electrical equipment and wiring.
  • Because water pipes conduct electricity, don’t take a bath or shower or use other plumbing during a storm.
  • Stay away from isolated tall trees, towers or utility poles. Lightning tends to strike taller object in an area.

Get an Emergency Weather Radio. It will broadcast the latest forecast for thunderstorms. Remember, any thunderstorm, whether it is severe or not, can produce deadly lightning.

Act fast if someone is struck by lightning:

Lightning victims don’t carry an electric charge and are safe to touch and need urgent medical attention. Cardiac arrest is the immediate cause of death.

If possible, move the victim to a safer place. Lightning can strike twice. Don’t be a victim.

Lightning Facts:

  • Lightning occurs in all thunderstorms; each year lightning strikes the United States 25 million times.
  • Lightning often strikes the same place repeatedly, especially tall isolated objects.
  • Most lightning victims are in open areas or near a tree.
  • The energy from one lightning flash could light a 100-watt light bulb for more than 3 months.
  • The air near a lightning strike is heated to 50,000°F-five times hotter than the surface of the sun!
  • The rapid heating and cooling of the air near the lightning channel causes a shock wave which results in thunder.

Lightning Myths:

Myth: Rubber tires on a car protect you from lightning by insulating you from the ground.

Fact: The metal roof and sides protect you, NOT the rubber tires. When lightning strikes a vehicle it goes through the metal frame into the ground. Don’t lean on the vehicle doors during a thunderstorm.

Myth: If trapped outside and lightning is about to strike you should lie flat on the ground.

Fact: Lying flat increases your chance of being hit by a ground current. If you are caught outside in a thunderstorm keep moving toward a safe shelter.

Myth: If thunderstorms threaten while you are outside playing a game it is OK to finish before seeking shelter.

Fact: Many lighting casualties occur because people do not seek shelter soon enough. No game is worth death or lifelong injuries. Seek shelter immediately if you hear thunder. Adults are responsible for the safety of children.

For additional information about lightning safety and awareness go to http: readywisconsin.wi.gov. You can also contact your local public health department, county emergency management director or the National Weather Service.

For more safety tips please review:

Thunderstorm Safety Checklist

Power Outage Checklist

Red Cross Offers Tips for a Safe 4th of July

Whether at the beach or in one’s backyard, follow these steps to enjoy the holiday.

The Independence Day Holiday is just around the corner and many people will visit the beach, enjoy fireworks, or fire up the grill for a backyard barbecue.

“The American Red Cross wants everyone to have a happy — and safe — Fourth of July holiday, and taking a few simple steps to stay safe can help ensure that this will be an enjoyable holiday for all,” said Steve Hansen, Chapter Executive

WATER SAFETY If swimming is part of someone’s holiday plans, they should check the weather and swim only at a lifeguard-protected pool or beach within the designated swimming area and obey all safety rules. Avoid alcohol before and during any water activities and make sure to never swim alone.

Other tips to keep in mind:

  • Actively supervise children at all times – even if a lifeguard is present. Stay within arm’s reach of young children when they are in the water.
  • Have weak swimmers wear a Coast Guard-approved life jacket. Don’t rely on water wings or inflatable toys.
  • Always enter shallow water feet first. Dive only in areas marked safe for diving. 

Additional water safety tips are located at redcross.org/watersafetytips.

WATCH THE SUN Everyone should limit the amount of direct sunlight they receive between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m., and apply broad-spectrum sunscreen with a protection factor of at least 15 throughout the day. Wear sunglasses that will absorb UV sunlight to protect one’s eyes. And remember to protect one’s feet by wearing some kind of beach shoes.

Stay hydrated by drinking plenty of fluids even if you do not feel thirsty. Avoid drinks with alcohol or caffeine in them. Wear loose-fitting clothing, lightweight and light colored. Avoid dark colors because they absorb the sun’s rays. Take frequent work if you must work outdoors. Do no leave any people or pets in vehicles.

Be a great neighbor by checking on family, friends and neighbors who do not have air conditioning, who spend much of their time alone or who are more likely to be affected by the heat, especially the elderly.

FIREWORKS SAFETY Nothing says “Fourth of July” like fireworks. To help stay safe while enjoying them, follow these safety steps:

  • Never give fireworks to small children and always follow the instructions on the packaging.
  • Keep a supply of water close by as a precaution.
  • Make sure the person lighting fireworks always wears eye protection.
  • Light only one firework at a time and never attempt to relight “a dud.”
  • Store fireworks in a cool, dry place away from children and pets.
  • Never throw or point fireworks toward people, animals, vehicles, structures or flammable materials.
  • Stay at least 500 feet away from professional fireworks displays.
  • Leave any area immediately where untrained amateurs are using fireworks. 

GRILLING SAFETY If a picnic and grilled goodies are part of someone’s holiday plans, they should follow these steps:

  • Always watch the barbecue grill when in use.
  • Never grill indoors – not in a house, camper, tent or any enclosed area.
  • Make sure children and pets stay away from the grill.
  • Keep the grill out in the open, away from the house, the deck, tree branches or anything that could catch fire. 
  • Use the long-handled tools especially made for cooking on the grill to keep the chef safe.
  • Never add charcoal starter fluid when coals have already been ignited.
  • Always follow the manufacturer’s instructions when using grills. 

In addition to these tips, all iPhone and Android smart phone owners should download the new, free American Red Cross First Aid app now so they will have information on how to treat everyday emergencies right in their hands. You can find the app in the Apple App Store and the Google Play Store for Android by searching for American Red Cross.

Super Donor Days and an Emergency Call for Blood

American Red Cross Issues Emergency Call for Blood Donors Now

Super Donor Days blood drive to help boost blood supply prior to July 4th

GREEN BAY, Wis. (June 25, 2012) – The American Red Cross blood supply has reached emergency levels with 50,000 fewer donations than expected in June. This shortfall leaves the Red Cross with half the readily available blood products on hand now than this time last year.

The Red Cross is calling on all eligible blood donors – now more than ever – to roll up a sleeve and give blood at the 26th Annual Super Donor Days Blood Drive held on July 2 and 3 at Shopko Hall. All blood types are needed, but especially O positive, O negative, B negative and A negative in order to meet patient demand this summer.

26th Annual Super Donor Days Blood Drive

Monday, July 2 from 12 p.m. to 7 p.m.

Tuesday, July 3 from 6:30 a.m. to 1 p.m.

Shopko Hall, 1901 Oneida St., Green Bay

An unseasonably early start to spring may be a contributing factor to this year’s decrease in donations. Many regular donors got an early start on summer activities and aren’t taking time to give blood. In addition, this year’s mid-week Independence Day holiday has reduced the number of scheduled Red Cross blood drives. Many sponsors, especially businesses, are unable to host drives because employees are taking extended vacations.

To thank those who generously make time to give blood at Super Donor Days, the Red Cross is offering all presenting donors a complimentary t-shirt along (while supplies last) with a chance to win great prizes including a $200 prize package redeemable at GiftCertificates.com.  The first 50 presenting donors on each day will receive a first-aid kit, courtesy of Bellin Health. All attendees can also enjoy special live entertainment and Glass Nickel pizza in the refreshment area. Complimentary childcare is available as well as free parking in front of Shopko Hall.

 

“Experience a Green Bay-area tradition and get involved this summer by giving the gift of life at Super Donor Days,” said Greg Novinska, CEO of the Red Cross Badger-Hawkeye Blood Services Region, serving Wisconsin, Eastern Iowa and Upper Michigan. “We need donors to make appointments in the coming days and weeks to help us ensure that all patient blood needs can be met. Each pint of whole blood can help save more than one life.”

The Red Cross would also like to thank WFRV-TV, Bellin Health, Glass Nickel Pizza Co. and PMI Entertainment Group for sponsoring this year’s lifesaving event.
How to Donate Blood

Simply call 1-800-RED CROSS (1-800-733-2767) or visit redcrossblood.org to make an appointment or for more information. All blood types are needed to ensure a reliable supply for patients. A blood donor card or driver’s license, or two other forms of identification are required at check-in.  Individuals who are 17 years of age (16 with parental permission in some states), weigh at least 110 pounds and are in generally good health may be eligible to donate blood. High school students and other donors 18 years of age and younger also have to meet certain height and weight requirements.

About the American Red Cross

The American Red Cross shelters, feeds and provides emotional support to victims of disasters; supplies more than 40 percent of the nation’s blood; teaches skills that save lives; provides international humanitarian aid; and supports military members and their families. The Red Cross is a not-for-profit organization that depends on volunteers and the generosity of the American public to perform its mission. For more information, please visit redcross.org or join our blog at blog.redcross.org.

Media Contact: Bobbi Snethen, (608) 298-6071, @RedCrossBloodBH   redcrossblood.org

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Volunteers Needed: Super Donor Days Blood Drive

The Super Donor Days blood drive will be taking place Monday, July 2 & Tuesday, July 3 at Shopko Hall, 1901 South Oneida Street, Green Bay.

We are looking for volunteers to help support this event. This is a good opportunity for teens, families to volunteer together, seniors or anyone!

Monday, July 2 ~ Shopko Hall

Donor Room Aide: Work in the blood donation area wiping down the beds after each use, carry bins with blood bags to the MUA’s for processing, and escort donors to the canteen area~

Time: 11:45am-4:00pm or 3:45pm-7:00pm or (or until the last donors pass through the area)

Canteen: Serve drinks and food to donors after their donation, monitor donors for post donation reactions

Time: 11:45am-4:00pm

Child Care Table: Supervise young children while their parent is donating

Time: 3:45pm-7:00pm (or until the last child passes through your area)

Blood Drop Costume: Wear blood drop costume and walk around outside along Lombardi & Oneida Street

Time: 11:45am-4:00pm or 3:45pm-7:00pm

Tuesday, July 3 ~ Shopko Hall

Donor Room Aide: Work in the blood donation area wiping down the beds after each use, carry bins with blood bags to the MUA’s for processing, and escort donors to the canteen area~

Time: 6:15am-10:00am or 9:45am-1:00pm (or until last donor passes through the area)    

Canteen: Serve drinks and food to donors after their donation, monitor donors for post donation reactions

Time: 6:15am-10:00am & 9:45am-1:00pm (or until last donor passes through the area)

Child Care Table: Supervise young children while their parent is donating

Time: 9:45am-1pm (or until last donor passes through the area)

Blood Drop Costume: Wear blood drop costume and walk around outside along Lombardi & Oneida Street

Time: 6:15am – 10:00am & 9:45am 1:00pm

To Register:

Call or e-mail: Mary Brunner at 920-227-4240 or mary.brunner@redcross.org

Other Instructions:

Attire: To have a consistent look and to identify the volunteers to the donor, please wear either black or tan pants/skirt/capris or shorts and a white shirt/blouse.

Check-in: Shopko Hall front entrance inside to the right as you enter.  15 minutes before the scheduled shift.

Volunteer Check in – Inside Shopko Hall – Once you get checked in you will be directed to the Team Supervisor for specific job instructions.

Food/Snacks: You will be provided food/snacks & beverages during your break.  If you would like to bring something to share feel free to do so.

If you have a specific area you would like to volunteer in please let me know.  We will try to accommodate your need.

Mike Petrick named Volunteer of the Year at Volunteer Awards Banquet

Volunteer of the Year Mike Petrick with (l-r) Judy Gregory, Regional Manager, Disaster Program and Dawn Comer, Office Manager, Iron Mountain.

Mike Petrick, of Iron Mountain, Mich., was named Volunteer of the Year at the Volunteer Recognition Awards for the American Red Cross of Northeast Wisconsin,  June 12, 2012.

He was recognized for his work on the Disaster Team and contributions to emergency planning services. Petrick joined the Red Cross in 2006 and has served as the Disaster Action Team Chairperson and Lead Responder. In this role, he organized monthly Disaster Team meetings and responds to fire calls and other emergency needs. He is an active member of the Iron Mountain Office Advisory Board as well.

He represents Red Cross at the Local Emergency Planning meetings in both Dickinson County, MI and Florence County, WI. He also works with the Dickinson County Healthcare System disaster planning committee. He has worked for many years with the Iron Mountain office’s main fundraiser, Red for Red.

Petrick was awarded the Volunteer of the Year Award for his continued service to the American Red Cross, reliability and passion for helping people. We are excited to present this award to such a worthy recipient. 

Local Collection Addresses Pet’s Needs After Disaster Strikes

The Countrycare Animal Complex staff presenting their donations to our volunteer disaster team members.

Countrycare Animal Complex to present local Red Cross with dozens of C.A.R.E. kits to help families provide for their pets after an emergency

Thanks to a generous donation of fifty pet disaster relief kits from Countrycare Animal Complex of Green Bay, the American Red Cross in Northeast Wisconsin is better equipped to provide immediate care supplies for the family dog or cat after disaster strikes.

Countrycare Animal Complex has been collecting donations of blankets, leashes, toys, cat litter, food bowls and pet food under the program C.A.R.E. for Paws. C.A.R.E. stands for Countrycare Animal Rescue Effort and was developed after staff members recognized that when a family is displaced from their home due to a disaster, they might not have what they need to care for their  pet(s).

“Our hope is that with these kits, people will be able to better care for their pets while they are in transition after a disaster”, said Dr. Karen Strickfaden, co-owner of Countrycare Animal Complex.

On Wednesday, June 20th, Countrycare employees presented the emergency kits to Red Cross Disaster Action Team members during their monthly planning meeting at the Red Cross office in Green Bay. Each kit will contain a blanket, a leash, a toy, food, water bowls and pet food. Cat kits will also include a litter box, litter and a scoop. Once emptied, the cardboard containers used to store the pet care items can then be used as crates for cats and small dogs.

“So many of our clients have pets and they are an important part of their families. In many disasters people have lost their lives trying to save their animals. The Red Cross works with the human component of the families in helping them address their recovery needs. We typically do not have the resources to address the needs of the cats and dogs. Countrycare Animal Complex has come forward to help us fill a very necessary need in the recovery process of our families–helping them care for their pets”, said Judy Gregory, Northeast Wisconsin Regional Disaster Program Manager.

Countrycare plans to continue growing the program and will have an ongoing need for donations. If you would like to support the C.A.R.E. for Paws program, monetary donations or supplies can be mailed or delivered to:

Attn: Care for Paws
Countrycare Animal Complex
4235 Elmview Rd.
Green Bay,WI54311

About Countrycare Animal Complex
Countrycare Animal Complex is a veterinary practice on the southeast side of Green Bay, Wisconsin which provides veterinary care for dogs, cats and horses. Countrycare is dedicated to promoting the welfare of animals through excellence in veterinary medicine, education, and service to our clients and community.

About the American Red Cross:

The American Red Cross shelters, feeds and provides emotional support to victims of disasters; supplies more than 40 percent of the nation’s blood; teaches skills that save lives; provides international humanitarian aid; and supports military members and their families. The Red Cross is a not-for-profit organization that depends on volunteers and the generosity of the American public to perform its mission. For more information, please visit redcross.org or join our blog at http://blog.redcross.org.

Local Cub Scout Troop Donates To Veteran’s Home

Cub Scout Pack 3763 worked with the American Red Cross to donate items for the Veterans Home in King, WI.

Pictured with a small sample of items they collected, from left to right is Jordan Friend, Cub Master, Tammy Biever, Shawn McCrary and Sam McCrary.

This was a special service project done by the Webelos from Rosenow Elementary. Also donating items to their cause were a number of Menards employees and Facebook friends. These items will be greatly appreciated by the veterans.

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