FREE! FREE! FREE!

Now that we have your attention! Let’s get trained in life-saving skills thanks to our Sheboygan County United Way partnership! All residents can receive free health & safety training. That’s right, from babysitting skills to first aid to even how to perform CPR or use an AED!  No strings attached! You just have to live in Sheboygan County, register (first registered basis) and attend the class by June 30, 2014.

9753338-standardClasses being hosted locally include:

  • Adult and Pediatric First Aid/CPR/AED
  • Adult and Pediatric CPR/AED
  • *Adult First Aid/CPR/AED
  • Adult CPR/AED
  • CPR/AED for the Professional Rescuer
  • Babysitter’s Training – designed for youth ages 11-13.

Classes are available at the Red Cross building at 2032 Erie Avenue, Sheboygan. For a complete list of courses descriptions, times, requirements, please go to www.redcross.org/Take-a-class.

You can also register by calling 800-RED-CROSS (800-733-2767) and press Option 3.  You must provide the Coupon Code of UWSHEBOYGAN0614 for the course to be complimentary.

If your organization, group or club wants to train a group of people at the same time, please contact terry.roe@redcross.orgor by calling 715-590-4495.

Would you know what to do in this situation?  Click HERE to read this life-saving story!

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7 Steps to Prevent the Flu

TRUE or FALSE?
The flu virus spreads from person-to-person in droplets of coughs or sneezes.
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Answer is: TRUE!
The virus can also spread if a person touches droplets on another person or object and then touches their own mouth or nose before washing their hands.

The most important step someone can take is to get a flu vaccine. The CDC recommends a yearly flu vaccine for everyone six months of age and older.
Follow these 7 steps to help prevent the spread of the flu virus:
1.     Stay home if sick.
2.     Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
3.     Cover the nose and mouth with a tissue or sleeve when coughing or sneezing, and throw the tissue away after use. If that’s not possible, cough or sneeze into the elbow, not the hands. People with the flu can spread it to others about six feet away through coughs and sneezes.
4.     Wash hands often, especially after coughing or sneezing. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand-rub.
5.     Avoid touching the eyes, nose or mouth.
6.     Disinfect surfaces used commonly such as door knobs, switches, phones, computers & remote controls.
7.     If someone has the flu they should avoid contact with others as much as possible.

DO I HAVE THE FLU? The common signs of influenza are high fever, severe body aches, headache, being extremely tired, sore throat, cough, runny or stuffy nose, and vomiting and/or diarrhea (more common in children). If someone thinks they have the flu, their health-care provider should be consulted. Someone should seek medical care immediately if they develop any of the following symptoms:m8740094_167x82-flu-grey

  • Fast breathing, trouble breathing or bluish skin color.
  • Pain or pressure in the chest or abdomen (adults).
  • Confusion or sudden dizziness.
  • Not drinking enough fluids, not being able to eat, or severe or persistent vomiting.
  • Flu-like symptoms that improve but then return with fever and worse cough.
    • Children – not waking up, being so irritable that the child does not want to be held or not interacting. Fever with a rash. No tears when crying or significantly fewer wet diapers than normal.

Information on what to do if someone has the flu is available as part of the free Red Cross First Aid mobile app available for iPhone and Android devices.You can find more information about how to help keep you and your loved ones protected by visiting redcross.org/FluTips.

What’s Included in Your Vehicle Winter Preparedness Kit?

m8540166_167x82-winter-storm-3The first day of winter is tomorrow but we are definitely getting hit with lots of snow already. Do you have all of the emergency essentials in your car? Having a vehicle emergency kit available is a great way to prepare for any road or winter emergencies. Also, most kits come in convenient sizes to fit in the glove box. Safety should always be the first priority. It’s recommended to avoid the roads, if necessarily. If you have to drive, be cautious; make sure to buckle up and have a full tank of gas also.

The American Red Cross has a list of essentials that should be included in your Vehicle Winter Preparedness Kit:

  • Flashlight with extra batteries
  • Cell Phone Car Charger
  • Blanket and/or emergency Mylar blanket
  • Fleece Hat, Gloves, Scarf
  • Flares
  • Folding Shovel
  • Sand or Cat Litter
  • Ice Scraper and Snow Brush
  • First-Aid Kit
  • Small battery-operated radio
  • Emergency contact card with names and phone numbers
  • Extra prescription medications
  • Bottled Water
  • High protein snacks
  • Maps
  • Whistle

There are two already-made kits available for purchase on redcross.orgItemImage_580_7193

  • Automobile first-aid zip kit. For $10.00, the kit includes an assortment of bandages, gauze, antiseptic, insect relief pads, sunscreen and sanitizer.
  • Personal Safety Emergency Pack. For $11.00, the kit includes emergency blanket, drinking water, emergency poncho, light stick, whistle, mini first-aid kit and mask.

Know the Difference

  • Winter Storm Outlook: Winter storm conditions are possible in the next 2 to 5 days.
  • Winter Storm Watch: Winter storm conditions are possible within the next 36 to 48 hours. People in a watch area should review their winter storm plans and stay informed about weather conditions.
  • Winter Weather Advisory: Winter weather conditions are expected to cause significant inconveniences and may be hazardous. When caution is used, these situations should not be life threatening.
  • Winter Storm Warning: Life-threatening, severe winter conditions have begun or will begin with 24 hours. People in a warning area should take precautions immediately.

Here is a checklist of precautions you can take during this wintery weather! Also for more information on disasters and emergency preparedness, visit redcross.org.

Who’s Ready to Watch Some Football Tomorrow?

By: PaKou Lee, Social Media Intern

578386_655499837794299_2053414044_nThe Packers will be playing against the Detroit Lions at Ford Field starting at 11:30 a.m. I thought the last game against the Minnesota Vikings was pretty rough. I was nervous throughout the entire overtime play. My home state versus my favorite football team. Of course, the Packers are my favorite.

I was never into football before moving here to Green Bay. My friends and family finally converted me after nearly a year of living in Green Bay. The culture here is definitely different than back at home in St. Paul. Green Bay has a lot of community events involving the Packers, smaller organizations and businesses. It feels more personable to me. Back at home, there’s so much going on; the city is bigger, there is a lot more to do. I’m always on the fast lane that sometimes I forget about what my home state is all about. I definitely appreciate both cultures and states. Just spreading my Minnesota Nice to Green Bay.

I’m still trying to understand football. When I started watching the games, I had a ton of questions: What is an interception? Where is the ball? Once I even made a silly, but serious comment, “Wow! The Packers had a really good home run.” Of course, I know the difference between a home run and a touchdown. It just slipped out. It still makes my family laugh when someone brings it up, so there’s something good in that. I’ll be sporting my Packer gear tomorrow and cheering them on. I hope you and your family have a great time watching the Packer game or any of the other teams playing tomorrow. Stay warm if you’re going to be outside.

Be Prepared – Get the app

First Aid App logo

Whether you’re watching the game at home or playing your own football game in your backyard this Thanksgiving, be prepared to handle the most common first aid emergencies. Get your head in the game and download our First Aid mobile app on your iPhone or Android device.

Too Blessed to be Stressed.

By PaKou Lee, Social Media Intern

Everyday I count my blessings in my head. I think about all the things I’m thankful for right before I sleep. I remind myself to be thankful of all the little and big things I take for granted, like mandatory overtime at work, a stranger’s laugh and my family.

I am especially thankful for my sisters, sister-in-laws, and nieces for their wonderful cooking! I can never lose a pound even with all of the cardio that I do because I am always eating good. Not only that, but I am also not that great of a cook so I am extra thankful for their delicious food. The aroma of curry in the kitchen and just thinking about the spiciness of papaya salad makes my mouth water. You don’t even have to ask my family about my cooking. I already know the answer:

“She can cook the basic scramble eggs, noodles, and rice. She might get you fast food if you raise your hand when she asks who’s hungry.”

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My sister-in-law, Sunning’s, green bean casserole from last year’s Thanksgiving. I always look forward to this dish because it’s so good!

It’s always a joke to say that in my family, but hey I know they give me credit for helping them prep, set the table, and clean.

I haven’t done any cooking or baking this year yet, but last year I was baking chocolate chip cookies for my family in Minnesota. I baked roughly 4 dozens of cookies. For my third dozen, it took a little bit longer to bake. I had no idea why it was taking 20 minutes when the instructions said about 10-12 minutes. After I took the cookies out of the oven, the middle was still gooey and raw. I came to realize I had turned off the oven when I took out the second batch. Haha, whoops! I told my family that if they eat a cookie that taste funny, it means good luck. Just kidding! My family still loves me though. It’s the thought that counts.

Noodles topped with cilantro!

Noodles topped with cilantro!

This Thanksgiving, I’m in charge of the pies and sparkling juice! Easy as 1-2-3! Except, I’m going to take on a challenge! Making cheesecake pumpkin pie. No worries, my 18-year-old niece, Dystany, is going to help and supervise. The little ones Nevaeh, Kace, & Cienna will definitely be the taste testers and there’s always back up pumpkin pies at the grocery store too!

When life gets a little out of control, I remind myself:

“Too blessed to be stressed.”

A little quote to share with you this Thanksgiving year. Don’t forget to view our cooking and traveling safety tips also. I hope you all have a belly-too-full-to-move Thanksgiving with your family and loved ones! Safe travels & stay warm!

Only Treats, No Onions!

By: PaKou Lee

spooktacular

Oct. 12th, 2013- Neveah, Lucky, Jada, Telvin, Cienna, Kace, Ethan, & Khloe at the Spooktacular event held at Lambeau Field. Typical teenager, Ethan is not too enthused being around the littles ones, but they’re all so cute!

I think everyone can agree with me that treats are great, but some tricks are even greater! I remember when I was in the fifth or sixth grade, my family and I went trick-or-treating around our neighborhood. At the end of the night, we all gathered in a circle at home to check every piece of candy to make sure they were good and not opened. As we looked through our goody bags, both of my cousins pulled out onions! How funny is that? I don’t know which neighbor did that, but that was a pretty slick trick up their sleeves!

This Halloween, I’m super bummed that I can’t go trick-or-treating with my nieces and nephews because I work late. I like going with them because I get to enjoy a few chocolate candies while on supervision duty. Of course when they notice their favorite chocolate bar is missing, I tell them the ghost took it. They never believe me but hey, you can’t blame me. I need all of the calories and energy I can get to catch up with these little vampires, ninjas, and witches. Before I know it the older ones are already playing tricks at the next house and the youngest one is still debating if they should walk up to the first house and face that creepy scarecrow sitting on the porch to get candy. I can’t wait to get home from work today and rummage through some of their hard-earned candies. I promise I’ll only take a little, only the ones I need.

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Before you head out for some trick-or-treating, check out these tips for a safe Halloween:

  • Look for flame-resistant costumes.
  • Plan the Trick-or-Treat route and make sure adults know where children are going. A parent or responsible adult should accompany young children as they make their way around the neighborhood.
  • Make sure the Trick-or-Treaters have a flashlight. Add reflective tape to costumes and Trick-or-Treat bags. Have everyone wear light-colored clothing in order to be seen.
  • Visit only the homes that have a porch light on. Accept treats at the door – never go inside.
  • Instead of masks, which can cover the eyes and make it hard to see, consider using face paint.
  • Walk only on the sidewalks, not in the street. If no sidewalk is available, walk at the edge of the roadway, facing traffic. Look both ways before crossing the street and cross only at the corner. Don’t cut across yards or use alleys. Don’t cross between parked cars.
  • Be cautious around pets and any other animals.

If you are passing out treats tonight for the ghosts and goblins, please remember:

  • Make sure the outdoor light is on.
  • Sweep leaves from the sidewalks and steps.
  • Clear the porch or front yard of any obstacles that a child could trip over.
  • Restrain any household pets.
  • Use a glow stick instead of a candle in the jack-o-lantern to avoid a fire hazard.

There might be a chance of rain tonight so don’t forget your umbrella and ponchos! I also recommend you visit Haunted Wisconsin for the trick-or-treat times in your area. Enjoy your candies and have a safe Halloween!

What is Your Disaster Plan for Your Pets?

By: PaKou Lee, Red Cross PR/Social Media Volunteer

I live with two very sassy, but loving Chihuahuas, Junie and Julie, both belonging to my niece, Nevaeh. I always thought that when a disaster strikes whether it is a tornado or a fire, everyone would gather, grab the dogs and find a safe place to be. As I researched for Preparedness Month, I realized there is much more to planning a pet disaster safety than just grabbing and keeping them safe.

It is not that I think Junie and Julie are less important; they are part of the family too. Many people including myself are just not sure where to start for pet emergencies. I have gathered some important safety tips so we can all be prepared- learn how to prepare for a pet emergency, know what should be included in the portable kit, and how to help your pets recover after a traumatic event.

Prepare:

  • Know which hotels and motels along your evacuation route will accept you and your pets in an emergency. Ask if no pet policies could be waived in an emergency.
  • Most American Red Cross shelters cannot accept pets because of health and safety concerns and other considerations. Service animals that assist people with disabilities are allowed in Red Cross shelters.
  • Include your pets in evacuation drills so that they become used to entering and traveling in their carriers calmly.
  • Make sure that your pet’s vaccinations are current and that all dogs and cats are wearing collars with securely fastened, up-to-date identification. Many pet shelters require proof of current vaccinations to reduce the spread of disease.

Your Kit Should Include:

  • Sturdy leashes, harnesses and/or carriers to transport pets safely and ensure that they can’t escape.
  • Food, drinking water, bowls, litter pans, pet beds and toys.
  • Medications, copies of medical records, your veterinarian’s name and number stored in a waterproof container.
  • A first aid kit.
  • Information on feeding schedules, medical conditions, and behavior problems.

Pet Recovery:

  • Watch your animals closely and keep them under your direct control as fences and gates may have been damaged.
  • Pets may become disoriented, particularly if the disaster has affected scent markers that normally allow them to find their home.
  • Be aware of hazards at nose and paw or hoof level, particularly debris, spilled chemicals, fertilizers and other substances that might not seem to be dangerous to humans.
  • Consult your veterinarian if any behavior problems persist.

    Our Chihuahuas, Julie (top) and Junie (bottom). Aren't they cute?

    Our Chihuahuas, Julie (top) and Junie (bottom).
    Aren’t they cute?

Red Cross also offers Pet First Aid class. You will learn how to administer medication to managing cardiac emergencies and more! If you have animals such as livestock, reptiles, birds, and other small animals, visit Humane Society of the United States or Ready.gov for more information on how to keep your animals safe.

Are Your Kids Ready to Walk to School?

By: PaKou Lee, Red Cross PR/Social Media Volunteer

It’s back to school week! I’m super excited to have my nieces and nephews back at school again. They grow up so quickly; sometimes I forget what grade they are in. I swear they were just babies not too long ago! They attend school not too far from where we live so usually it is a 3-minute car ride or nice walk to school. During the cool and warm weather it is all about walking.

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Look at that smirk on Kace’s face. He didn’t want to take a picture.

I enjoy my walks with them, especially after school. I start our talks with my typical questions of asking how school went, what they ate for lunch and if they have any homework or reading to do. Last year, I think I asked way too much because my nephew, Kace, now 7, refuses to tell me what he eats for lunch. He would whine, “Why do you always ask us what we ate for lunch?”

Then of course, right after that, he would hand me his blue Skylander backpack so he can run off to be the first one home. And me being the worried aunt that I am, I always shout, “Wait for me! You better not cross the street yet!” or “Stay to your right. Watch out for the people on the bikes!”

Knowing me so well, Kace likes to test his limits with me.  He would pretend he is about to cross the street and shout “I’m going to cross the street, Auntie PaKou.” This boy wants to give me a panic attack! Again, knowing me so well, he knows not to cross without me. As a reminder, I tell Kace, my nieces, Nevaeh and Cienna, to look for cars both ways, stay a foot back from the curb, and wait for an adult to cross the street. I’m sure I’ve established these safety tips into their carefree minds but sometimes kids forget!

Today, Nevaeh asked if she could walk with her friends to school instead of getting a ride. She has been asking all week so their dad, Pheng, my brother agreed. And of course, I stand at the porch with their baby sister, Khloe, on my hip reminding Nevaeh that she is the older one so she needs to watch after Kace and Cienna, don’t talk to strangers and for the little ones to listen to her. A part of me wanted to walk with them to make sure they were safe, but I told myself I trust them to make the best decision.

Nevaeh & Cienna crossing the street to school.

Nevaeh & Cienna crossing the street to school.

I’ve shared just some of the basic walking tips, but here are more tips you can utilize and share with other children:

  • Stay Alert: Don’t get distracted by your phone or music player. Put your electronics away and focus on the sidewalk and road, especially when crossing the street.
  • Walk with a Buddy: Don’t walk alone. Always walk with someone you know or with an adult. Don’t talk to strangers. If a stranger approaches you, find a trusted adult or go to a safe spot. Never follow or go into a stranger’s car.
  • Listen to the Cross Guards:  Look for the pedestrian signs and wait until the cross guard signals the okay to cross the street.
  • Stay Aware of Runners and Bikers: Not only do you have to watch out for cars, but also for runners and bikers. Stay clear of their way. Bikers should ring their bike bells and runner should call out that they are passing you.
  • Be Visible: Always walk on the sidewalk. If there is no sidewalk, walk facing the traffic. Wear bright colors so drivers can spot you easily.

Parents, make sure you practice walking to school with your children so they remember the route that is safe for them. Let’s make this school year an exciting and safe year!

American Red Cross and Walmart Announce Nurse Assistant Training Scholarships

$50,000 available to empower students throughout Wisconsin to pursue Health Care industry careers

*** On Thursday, August 29th between Noon – 4:00p.m. we can provide tours of the Green Bay training location. In addition, Paulene Kipke, the statewide program manager, will be there to discuss the training, benefits, demonstrate a few skills ****

CNA class 8.09 018The American Red Cross in Wisconsin will help 50 students across the state receive nursing & life-skills training for entry-level healthcare careers through the Red Cross Nurse Assistant Training (NAT) program thanks to a $50,000 grant from the Walmart Foundation.

The hands-on health care training program is available on a monthly basis in Altoona, Green Bay, Oshkosh & Waupaca with the next courses beginning the first week of September. The curriculum equips students for a career into the fast-growing health care industry. With the growing senior population, this training will help communities like ours alleviate a shortage of adequately trained Certified Nurse Assistants (CNAs). With small class sizes, limited to 16-students, individual hands-on time is guaranteed which has historically meant 94% of Red Cross trained students pass the state testing exam on their first attempt.  With the certification, CNA wages range from $9.25 – $16.65 per hour, which is much higher than minimum wage and often include a variety of benefits.

By joining forces with Walmart and the Red Cross training, graduates can earn higher wages and find jobs that provide health insurance for themselves and their families. The collaboration will help meet Walmart’s goal of empowering women throughout Wisconsin, the U.S. and around the world.  To complement the nursing skills, each participant will participate in an additional 16-hours of life-skills designed to help them turn training into a professional career. Topics will range from building a resume, interviewing skills and personal finance with a distinct emphasis on professionalism, punctuality and a commitment towards work. With the scholarship, the tuition is only $250.00. Plus, due to the State of Wisconsin Medicaid training reimbursement program, this cost could also be recouped by the student upon gaining qualified employment.

Red Cross NAT instructors equip students with the skills required to become CNAs and provide basic care such as feeding, dressing, bathing and monitoring patients so they can work in long-term care facilities such as nursing homes and assisted living, hospitals and in-home health care.

The scholarship is available across the state so students can participate in classes in Altoona, Green Bay, Oshkosh and/or Waupaca.  Course locations, dates, time and registration information is available at redcross.org/WINAT.  The scholarships are on a first registered basis and the complete application must be submitted by October 15th. Specific course questions should be directed to Tanya Christianson at 715-902-1035 and/or Tanya.Christianson@redcross.org. Later this fall, the course may also be available in La Crosse and Woodville.

The American Red Cross has trained and engaged America’s nurses in its life saving mission for more than 130 years. Last year, the Red Cross taught health and safety skills to nearly 12 million people nationwide, including 336 Nursing Assistants throughout the State of Wisconsin

This is the first credential-specific training grant Walmart has awarded as part of their Global Women’s Economic Empowerment Initiative, one of which is to help 200,000 U.S. women from low-income households access job training, education, career counseling, and mentoring to increase their employment opportunities. More information on this initiative can be found at corporate.walmart.com/women.

American Red Cross Offers Discount on Babysitting Courses

Area Youth Can Learn How to Handle Emergencies and Build a Business


Don’t be that type of babysitter from the video. Take one of our Red Cross babysitting courses and learn all of the right skills and safety techniques. Get on your way to earning money this summer.

The American Red Cross is offering a 20 percent discount on babysitting course registrations through the end of July.

Three Red Cross babysitting course options are available for 11- to 15-year-olds. The Babysitter’s Basics online course, Babysitter’s Training classroom course and an extended classroom course with Pediatric First Aid/CPR are all eligible for the discount using coupon code INDY200913 (case sensitive) when registering online at redcross.org/takeaclass or by calling 1-800-REDCROSS. All registrations made through July 31 are eligible for the discount regardless of when the course takes place.

Babysitter’s Training classroom courses are scheduled from 8:30a.m. – 4:00p.m and are the local American Red Cross offices.

July 24, Oshkosh, WI

July 29, Green Bay, WI

July 30, Appleton, WI

August 3, Oshkosh, WI

August 3, Green Bay, WI

August 22, Iron Mountain, MI

August 24, Green Bay, WI

“All of the course options provide students with a range of training and skills so they can jump start their babysitting career and show potential employers they know their stuff,” said Sara Weier, Preparedness, Health & Safety Manager. “Participants learn to keep themselves and the children they are responsible for safe, including how to handle situations that sitters are likely to encounter such as treating bleeding, bee stings, and burns.”

America’s youth have been learning how to be responsible babysitters by taking American Red Cross training for more than 35 years.

The format of the Babysitting Basics online course allows future sitters to learn at anytime and to go through the content at their own pace. Classroom course participants have hands-on skills practice and receive feedback from expert Red Cross instructors. Youth who complete the extended course received a 2-year certification in Pediatric First Aid/CPR. Additional course information is available at redcross.org/babysitting.

“Parents and guardians want to entrust their children to a babysitter who is trained in childcare skills, First Aid and CPR,” added Weier “Trained and responsible sitters are an invaluable resource.”

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