Help Provide Swimming Lessons to those in Need!

CLICK HERE to participate in this GROUPON DEAL: $10 Donation to the American Red Cross

m6040248_241x164-learn-to-swimThe Issue: Lack of Swimming Skills

Every day, an average of 10 people die from unintentional drowning in the U.S.—two of those being children aged 14 or younger. For every child who dies from drowning, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, another five received emergency care from water-related incidents. A 2014 Red Cross survey found that while 80 percent of Americans said they could swim, only 56 percent are self-described swimmers and 33 percent of African American respondents can perform all of the five basic swimming skills that are needed to be competent in the water.

The Campaign: Teaching Children to Swim

All donations to this Grassroots campaign will be used by the American Red Cross to support the Aquatics Centennial Campaign, a new initiative to cut the drowning rate by 50% in 50 cities in the next 3 to 5 years. For every $10 raised, the organization can help provide a swimming lessons for one child or adult from an at-risk community.

This year marks the 100th anniversary of the Red Cross’s water safety education program. To celebrate, through its Centennial Campaign, the organization aims to teach 50,000 more people in these cities how to swim and respond to emergency situations. The program targets families in high-risk areas, and includes teaching parents how to perform CPR as well as equipping older teens and young adults with the skills to become lifeguards and swim instructors. People are also encouraged to download the free Red Cross Swim App to track their or their children’s swim progress and learn about water safety with videos and quizzes.

In A Nutshell: 

Donations help prevent drowning accidents during the summer by providing swimming lessons for children in underserved communities

The Fine Print

100% of donations go directly to American Red Cross. Donations are automatically applied. See Grassroots FAQs that apply to this campaign. Merchant is solely responsible to purchasers for the care and quality of the advertised goods and services.

Download the Red Cross Swim App!

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Learn more about water safety, including simple steps you can take to help ensure the safety of your family in a variety of environments, such as home pools and the ocean.

TEXT ‘SWIM’ to 90999 or download from the Apple App StoreGoogle Play or Amazon Marketplace.

Red Cross Issues Tips to Keep You Safe This 4th of July

 Throughout the Fourth of July week, many people will be traveling, firing-up the backyard grill or enjoying fireworks, and the American Red Cross offers a series of steps everyone can follow to safely enjoy the holiday.

FIREWORKS SAFETY The best way to enjoy fireworks is to attend a public fireworks show put on by professionals. Here are five safety steps for people setting fireworks off at home:

1. Never give fireworks to small children, and always follow the instructions on the packaging.
2. Keep a supply of water close by as a precaution.
3. Make sure the person lighting fireworks always wears eye protection.
4. Light only one firework at a time and never attempt to relight “a dud.”
5. Never throw or point a firework toward people, animals, vehicles, structures or flammable materials.

GRILLING SAFETY Every year people are injured while using charcoal or gas grills. Here are several steps to safely cook treats for the backyard barbecue:

1. Always supervise a barbecue grill when in use.
2. Never grill indoors – not in the house, camper, tent, or any enclosed area.
3. Make sure everyone, including the pets, stays away from the grill.
4. Keep the grill out in the open, away from the house, the deck, tree branches, or anything that could catch fire.
5. Use the long-handled tools especially made for cooking on the grill to keep the chef safe.

signsHIGHWAY SAFETY Millions of people will be on the highways throughout the Fourth of July week. The Red Cross offers five things everyone should do to stay safe while traveling:

1. Buckle seat belts, observe speed limits.
2. Do not drink and drive.
3. Pay full attention to the road – don’t use a cell phone to call or text.
4. Use caution in work zones.
5. Clean the vehicle’s lights and windows to help the driver see, especially at night. Turn theheadlights on as dusk approaches, or during inclement weather.

DOWNLOAD OUR FREE FIRST AID APP  PHSS_FIrstAid_IMGv1-JH

The Red Cross has a free Red Cross First Aid App to put expert advice for everyday emergencies at your fingertips. The app is available for smart phones and tablets and can be downloaded from the Apple or Google Play for Android app stores.

Have a safe and fun 4th of July!

New Advanced Child Care Training for Older Sitters and Nannies

advanced child careThe American Red Cross is now offering Advanced Child Care Training, a course for people 16-years and older who are or plan to become nannies, sought-after babysitters or who are caring for kids for the first time in a residential setting.

“Parents often have a tough time finding good child care, and the Red Cross makes it easier to spot the best sitters,” said Sara Weier, Health & Safety Program Manager. “The new Red Cross Advanced Child Care Training course helps people become the best sitter they can by teaching exactly what to do in emergencies and typical child care situations.”

Parents value a well-trained sitter, as more than 80 percent of parents say they would pay more for a sitter who is trained in CPR, first aid and child care skills, according to a 2012 Red Cross survey. The course is also a good option for grandparents and other relatives who might want a child care refresher before watching young children.

Currently, the Advanced Child Care Training class is scheduled for:

  • Thursday, May 29th American Red Cross office, 1302. E. Wisconsin Avenue, Appleton; 9am-4pm

To sign-up please click here.

This Red Cross course enables people to learn while having fun by blending tried-and-true information with digital learning techniques. Participants will learn the most common child care routines and behavior along with safety inside and outside of the house. The course also includes Pediatric First Aid, CPR and AED training and certification.

Other features of the training include:

  • 24/7 access to the self-paced, online training portion
  • Hands-on skills training and assessment
  • A resource center with downloadable skill sheets on child care subjects, lesson summaries, fact sheets, templates for résumés and business cards, administrative forms and age‐appropriate activity ideas.

People who would like to sign up for the program should visit redcross.org/childcare for more information. The course is eight and a half hours and costs $129. It combines two hours of self-paced online learning and six and a half hours of in-person training and skills testing. Upon completion, course takes will receive a two-year certification in both Advanced Child Care Training and Pediatric First Aid/CPR/AED.

Advanced Child Care Training is not a licensing program and does not meet all state requirements for childcare centers or daycare providers.

Red Cross Wants to Recognize Nurses During National Nurses Week

Nursing Week

National Nurses Week is May 6 – 12 and the American Red Cross is joining the celebration, recognizing the important contributions of its nurses.

This year’s theme for National Nurses Week is “Nurses: Leading the Way” to recognize nurses as leaders at the bedside, in the boardroom, throughout communities and in the halls of government. For more than 130 years, nurses have been an important part of the mission of the Red Cross, providing assistance during times of disaster and conflict.

Today, nurses provide a health perspective for the Red Cross, serving across all lines of service. Across the country, nurses serve in management and supervisory roles at Red Cross chapter and blood service regions, many in executive positions. Nurses hold leadership roles as Regional, State and Division Nurse Leaders and as members of the Red Cross national Board of Governors as well as board members on the local level.

Throughout the past week, professionally licensed nurses who double as trained Red Cross responders  have been deployed to southern states ravaged by tornadoes and floods. Plus, they serve locally at residential fires to community events.

Red Cross nurses make a difference. Would you like to be part of their proud tradition of dedicated service? Join the more than 15,000 Red Cross nurses who respond to disasters, teach health and safety classes, help members of the military and their families and assist at Red Cross blood drives. You too can be a Red Cross Nurse. For more information, visit www.redcross.org.

American Red Cross Certified Nursing Assistant (CNA) training is available at six locations. The course provides skills to start a new career in the health care industry. Students learn in a hands-on environment under the eyes of caring and professional nurses, bolstered by a nationally developed Red Cross curriculum that is approved by the State of Wisconsin Department of Health Services.  Scholarships and enrollment details are available at www.redcross.org/winat.

FREE! FREE! FREE!

Now that we have your attention! Let’s get trained in life-saving skills thanks to our Sheboygan County United Way partnership! All residents can receive free health & safety training. That’s right, from babysitting skills to first aid to even how to perform CPR or use an AED!  No strings attached! You just have to live in Sheboygan County, register (first registered basis) and attend the class by June 30, 2014.

9753338-standardClasses being hosted locally include:

  • Adult and Pediatric First Aid/CPR/AED
  • Adult and Pediatric CPR/AED
  • *Adult First Aid/CPR/AED
  • Adult CPR/AED
  • CPR/AED for the Professional Rescuer
  • Babysitter’s Training – designed for youth ages 11-13.

Classes are available at the Red Cross building at 2032 Erie Avenue, Sheboygan. For a complete list of courses descriptions, times, requirements, please go to www.redcross.org/Take-a-class.

You can also register by calling 800-RED-CROSS (800-733-2767) and press Option 3.  You must provide the Coupon Code of UWSHEBOYGAN0614 for the course to be complimentary.

If your organization, group or club wants to train a group of people at the same time, please contact terry.roe@redcross.orgor by calling 715-590-4495.

Would you know what to do in this situation?  Click HERE to read this life-saving story!

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7 Steps to Prevent the Flu

TRUE or FALSE?
The flu virus spreads from person-to-person in droplets of coughs or sneezes.
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Answer is: TRUE!
The virus can also spread if a person touches droplets on another person or object and then touches their own mouth or nose before washing their hands.

The most important step someone can take is to get a flu vaccine. The CDC recommends a yearly flu vaccine for everyone six months of age and older.
Follow these 7 steps to help prevent the spread of the flu virus:
1.     Stay home if sick.
2.     Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
3.     Cover the nose and mouth with a tissue or sleeve when coughing or sneezing, and throw the tissue away after use. If that’s not possible, cough or sneeze into the elbow, not the hands. People with the flu can spread it to others about six feet away through coughs and sneezes.
4.     Wash hands often, especially after coughing or sneezing. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand-rub.
5.     Avoid touching the eyes, nose or mouth.
6.     Disinfect surfaces used commonly such as door knobs, switches, phones, computers & remote controls.
7.     If someone has the flu they should avoid contact with others as much as possible.

DO I HAVE THE FLU? The common signs of influenza are high fever, severe body aches, headache, being extremely tired, sore throat, cough, runny or stuffy nose, and vomiting and/or diarrhea (more common in children). If someone thinks they have the flu, their health-care provider should be consulted. Someone should seek medical care immediately if they develop any of the following symptoms:m8740094_167x82-flu-grey

  • Fast breathing, trouble breathing or bluish skin color.
  • Pain or pressure in the chest or abdomen (adults).
  • Confusion or sudden dizziness.
  • Not drinking enough fluids, not being able to eat, or severe or persistent vomiting.
  • Flu-like symptoms that improve but then return with fever and worse cough.
    • Children – not waking up, being so irritable that the child does not want to be held or not interacting. Fever with a rash. No tears when crying or significantly fewer wet diapers than normal.

Information on what to do if someone has the flu is available as part of the free Red Cross First Aid mobile app available for iPhone and Android devices.You can find more information about how to help keep you and your loved ones protected by visiting redcross.org/FluTips.

What’s Included in Your Vehicle Winter Preparedness Kit?

m8540166_167x82-winter-storm-3The first day of winter is tomorrow but we are definitely getting hit with lots of snow already. Do you have all of the emergency essentials in your car? Having a vehicle emergency kit available is a great way to prepare for any road or winter emergencies. Also, most kits come in convenient sizes to fit in the glove box. Safety should always be the first priority. It’s recommended to avoid the roads, if necessarily. If you have to drive, be cautious; make sure to buckle up and have a full tank of gas also.

The American Red Cross has a list of essentials that should be included in your Vehicle Winter Preparedness Kit:

  • Flashlight with extra batteries
  • Cell Phone Car Charger
  • Blanket and/or emergency Mylar blanket
  • Fleece Hat, Gloves, Scarf
  • Flares
  • Folding Shovel
  • Sand or Cat Litter
  • Ice Scraper and Snow Brush
  • First-Aid Kit
  • Small battery-operated radio
  • Emergency contact card with names and phone numbers
  • Extra prescription medications
  • Bottled Water
  • High protein snacks
  • Maps
  • Whistle

There are two already-made kits available for purchase on redcross.orgItemImage_580_7193

  • Automobile first-aid zip kit. For $10.00, the kit includes an assortment of bandages, gauze, antiseptic, insect relief pads, sunscreen and sanitizer.
  • Personal Safety Emergency Pack. For $11.00, the kit includes emergency blanket, drinking water, emergency poncho, light stick, whistle, mini first-aid kit and mask.

Know the Difference

  • Winter Storm Outlook: Winter storm conditions are possible in the next 2 to 5 days.
  • Winter Storm Watch: Winter storm conditions are possible within the next 36 to 48 hours. People in a watch area should review their winter storm plans and stay informed about weather conditions.
  • Winter Weather Advisory: Winter weather conditions are expected to cause significant inconveniences and may be hazardous. When caution is used, these situations should not be life threatening.
  • Winter Storm Warning: Life-threatening, severe winter conditions have begun or will begin with 24 hours. People in a warning area should take precautions immediately.

Here is a checklist of precautions you can take during this wintery weather! Also for more information on disasters and emergency preparedness, visit redcross.org.

Who’s Ready to Watch Some Football Tomorrow?

By: PaKou Lee, Social Media Intern

578386_655499837794299_2053414044_nThe Packers will be playing against the Detroit Lions at Ford Field starting at 11:30 a.m. I thought the last game against the Minnesota Vikings was pretty rough. I was nervous throughout the entire overtime play. My home state versus my favorite football team. Of course, the Packers are my favorite.

I was never into football before moving here to Green Bay. My friends and family finally converted me after nearly a year of living in Green Bay. The culture here is definitely different than back at home in St. Paul. Green Bay has a lot of community events involving the Packers, smaller organizations and businesses. It feels more personable to me. Back at home, there’s so much going on; the city is bigger, there is a lot more to do. I’m always on the fast lane that sometimes I forget about what my home state is all about. I definitely appreciate both cultures and states. Just spreading my Minnesota Nice to Green Bay.

I’m still trying to understand football. When I started watching the games, I had a ton of questions: What is an interception? Where is the ball? Once I even made a silly, but serious comment, “Wow! The Packers had a really good home run.” Of course, I know the difference between a home run and a touchdown. It just slipped out. It still makes my family laugh when someone brings it up, so there’s something good in that. I’ll be sporting my Packer gear tomorrow and cheering them on. I hope you and your family have a great time watching the Packer game or any of the other teams playing tomorrow. Stay warm if you’re going to be outside.

Be Prepared – Get the app

First Aid App logo

Whether you’re watching the game at home or playing your own football game in your backyard this Thanksgiving, be prepared to handle the most common first aid emergencies. Get your head in the game and download our First Aid mobile app on your iPhone or Android device.

Too Blessed to be Stressed.

By PaKou Lee, Social Media Intern

Everyday I count my blessings in my head. I think about all the things I’m thankful for right before I sleep. I remind myself to be thankful of all the little and big things I take for granted, like mandatory overtime at work, a stranger’s laugh and my family.

I am especially thankful for my sisters, sister-in-laws, and nieces for their wonderful cooking! I can never lose a pound even with all of the cardio that I do because I am always eating good. Not only that, but I am also not that great of a cook so I am extra thankful for their delicious food. The aroma of curry in the kitchen and just thinking about the spiciness of papaya salad makes my mouth water. You don’t even have to ask my family about my cooking. I already know the answer:

“She can cook the basic scramble eggs, noodles, and rice. She might get you fast food if you raise your hand when she asks who’s hungry.”

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My sister-in-law, Sunning’s, green bean casserole from last year’s Thanksgiving. I always look forward to this dish because it’s so good!

It’s always a joke to say that in my family, but hey I know they give me credit for helping them prep, set the table, and clean.

I haven’t done any cooking or baking this year yet, but last year I was baking chocolate chip cookies for my family in Minnesota. I baked roughly 4 dozens of cookies. For my third dozen, it took a little bit longer to bake. I had no idea why it was taking 20 minutes when the instructions said about 10-12 minutes. After I took the cookies out of the oven, the middle was still gooey and raw. I came to realize I had turned off the oven when I took out the second batch. Haha, whoops! I told my family that if they eat a cookie that taste funny, it means good luck. Just kidding! My family still loves me though. It’s the thought that counts.

Noodles topped with cilantro!

Noodles topped with cilantro!

This Thanksgiving, I’m in charge of the pies and sparkling juice! Easy as 1-2-3! Except, I’m going to take on a challenge! Making cheesecake pumpkin pie. No worries, my 18-year-old niece, Dystany, is going to help and supervise. The little ones Nevaeh, Kace, & Cienna will definitely be the taste testers and there’s always back up pumpkin pies at the grocery store too!

When life gets a little out of control, I remind myself:

“Too blessed to be stressed.”

A little quote to share with you this Thanksgiving year. Don’t forget to view our cooking and traveling safety tips also. I hope you all have a belly-too-full-to-move Thanksgiving with your family and loved ones! Safe travels & stay warm!

Only Treats, No Onions!

By: PaKou Lee

spooktacular

Oct. 12th, 2013- Neveah, Lucky, Jada, Telvin, Cienna, Kace, Ethan, & Khloe at the Spooktacular event held at Lambeau Field. Typical teenager, Ethan is not too enthused being around the littles ones, but they’re all so cute!

I think everyone can agree with me that treats are great, but some tricks are even greater! I remember when I was in the fifth or sixth grade, my family and I went trick-or-treating around our neighborhood. At the end of the night, we all gathered in a circle at home to check every piece of candy to make sure they were good and not opened. As we looked through our goody bags, both of my cousins pulled out onions! How funny is that? I don’t know which neighbor did that, but that was a pretty slick trick up their sleeves!

This Halloween, I’m super bummed that I can’t go trick-or-treating with my nieces and nephews because I work late. I like going with them because I get to enjoy a few chocolate candies while on supervision duty. Of course when they notice their favorite chocolate bar is missing, I tell them the ghost took it. They never believe me but hey, you can’t blame me. I need all of the calories and energy I can get to catch up with these little vampires, ninjas, and witches. Before I know it the older ones are already playing tricks at the next house and the youngest one is still debating if they should walk up to the first house and face that creepy scarecrow sitting on the porch to get candy. I can’t wait to get home from work today and rummage through some of their hard-earned candies. I promise I’ll only take a little, only the ones I need.

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Before you head out for some trick-or-treating, check out these tips for a safe Halloween:

  • Look for flame-resistant costumes.
  • Plan the Trick-or-Treat route and make sure adults know where children are going. A parent or responsible adult should accompany young children as they make their way around the neighborhood.
  • Make sure the Trick-or-Treaters have a flashlight. Add reflective tape to costumes and Trick-or-Treat bags. Have everyone wear light-colored clothing in order to be seen.
  • Visit only the homes that have a porch light on. Accept treats at the door – never go inside.
  • Instead of masks, which can cover the eyes and make it hard to see, consider using face paint.
  • Walk only on the sidewalks, not in the street. If no sidewalk is available, walk at the edge of the roadway, facing traffic. Look both ways before crossing the street and cross only at the corner. Don’t cut across yards or use alleys. Don’t cross between parked cars.
  • Be cautious around pets and any other animals.

If you are passing out treats tonight for the ghosts and goblins, please remember:

  • Make sure the outdoor light is on.
  • Sweep leaves from the sidewalks and steps.
  • Clear the porch or front yard of any obstacles that a child could trip over.
  • Restrain any household pets.
  • Use a glow stick instead of a candle in the jack-o-lantern to avoid a fire hazard.

There might be a chance of rain tonight so don’t forget your umbrella and ponchos! I also recommend you visit Haunted Wisconsin for the trick-or-treat times in your area. Enjoy your candies and have a safe Halloween!

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