You Wore WHAT to Go Sledding?

By PaKou Lee, Social Media Intern

I can’t remember the last time I went sledding. I know it has to be at least more than five years ago because I’ve lived in Green Bay for four years now and I haven’t gone yet. With the holiday spirit still into play, I went sledding with my family two weekends ago. We headed for Triangle Sports Area right on Beverly Road near Baird Creek.

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Look at that view! That’s the hill that my family and I sled on. Can you imagine walking all the way back up after a speedy downhill? Luckily, the park had a tow rope to pull us up!

I was wearing my black, fashionable boots from Target and my toes were feeling super cold already. I wasn’t sure if I was going to survive the whole day of sledding. I didn’t think it would be too bad since I haven’t had any issues wearing them when shoveling the snow previously. Little did I know, just how cold it was going to get for my little toes.

After the first down hill and walking back up while dragging the tube, I couldn’t feel my toes anymore. I knew I wouldn’t be able to last another five minutes outside. I had my brother, Pheng, take me home to change my boots. I am so thankful that my niece Nevaeh, 10, and I share the same shoe size (Don’t judge my small feet… we share the same size for only certain types of shoes, haha). I wore her extra snow boots. I made sure to double my socks and changed my jacket too! The zipper was broken so I couldn’t zip at all. My sweater was little protection from the cold. Not sure what I was thinking when I got dressed. Probably because I didn’t have my coffee but I definitely learned my lesson.

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Jada, 6, all ready for a day of sledding and hot coco! Check out her cute owl hat!

So with my learning experience, I want to show you a prime example of what you should be wearing for sledding. Jada, my 6-year-old niece was my sledding partner. She was definitely more prepared than me!

  • Winter jacket
  • Hat
  • Face mask
  • Scarf
  • Mittens/Gloves
  • Snow pants
  • Snow boots
    And of course, always LAYER, LAYER, LAYER!!!

I also want to encourage you to watch a video of Dr. David Markenson, chair of the Red Cross Scientific Advisory Council, provides winter weather tips to keep you safe when you are active outdoors. For more winter weather safety, visit redcross.org.

American Red Cross Offers Thanksgiving Cooking and Travel Tips

thansgivingMillions of Americans will be preparing meals and traveling throughout the Thanksgiving holiday weekend. The American Red Cross has safety tips for the kitchen and for the highway.

“More home cooking fires occur on Thanksgiving than on any other day of the year,” said Steve Hansen, Regional Chief Operating Officer. “The week of Thanksgiving is also one of the busiest travel periods. We want people to arrive at their destinations, enjoy time with their loved ones and make it home safely.”

COOKING SAFETY:  Cooking is the leading cause of home fires and related injuries. Follow these safety tips:

  • Keep children and pets at least three feet away from the cooking area.
  • Clean all cooking surfaces to prevent grease buildup.
  • Stay in the kitchen while frying, grilling or broiling food. Turn burners off if leaving the kitchen.
  • Keep a pan lid or baking sheet nearby. Use it to cover the pan if it catches on fire.
  • Place turkey fryers outside and away from the house, deck and garage.

TRAVEL SAFETY:  Vehicles should be in good working order before heading out. Remember to:

  • Pack emergency supplies like blankets, water and snacks, flashlight and first aid kit.
  • Fill the fuel tank, check air pressure in tires and top-off windshield fluid.
  • Buckle up and obey all traffic signs.
  • Avoid distractions while driving like using mobile phones to talk or text.
  • Designate a driver who won’t be drinking whenever alcohol is served.

holiday-safetyThe Red Cross has a variety of emergency supplies and first aid kits available at redcrossstore.org.

KNOW HOW TO TREAT EMERGENCIES: People can learn how to respond to emergencies by downloading the free American Red Cross First Aid App. Users receive instant access to expert advice whenever and wherever they need it. The app is available in the Apple App Store or the Google Play Store by searching for American Red Cross or by going to redcross.org/mobileapps.

Finding a sitter requires some creative searching

Written by Jennifer Hogeland For Press-Gazette Media

As the holidays approach, and the invitations to parties pour in, parents must start their search for a sitter. If grandparents aren’t available to watch your little ones for that gotta-go-to bash, it’s necessary to enlist the help of a babysitter.

Finding just the right person to care for your children is no small task. The first challenge is finding a willing and capable teen. Then, before leaving your little darlings in his or her hands, there are several things you should discuss to be sure both of you will be happy with the arrangement.

Area experts offered suggestions on finding and interviewing potential babysitters before your night out on the town.

Finding the right match

Keep an eye open for responsible teens. Unfortunately, there isn’t a magical list of certified and interested babysitters available from area organizations or the American Red Cross, so parents have to get creative.

Sara Weier oversees the babysitter training program for the American Red Cross in Wisconsin and she explains the best way to find potential babysitters is by reaching out to neighbors or community organizations.

“We tell potential babysitters to connect with neighborhood associations, churches and to talk with parents and other babysitters to make their interest in babysitting known,” says Weier.

Word of mouth is key, suggests Yvonne Duffek, an American Red Cross certified babysitting instructor. Babysitters are told not to put their information on public boards; students are encouraged to hand out personalized business cards to trusted adults that could assist with their job search. So, ask around. Chances are friends and neighbors have a name or two to share.

Several websites have also popped up in recent years as a resource for parents searching for sitters in the area. Sites like sittercity.com and care.com provide a list of babysitters by zip code. You need to create an account and there may be fees for the information you seek. Peruse the detailed profiles of potential candidates before setting up an interview.

Paying the going rate

Discussing payment is a necessary conversation when hiring a babysitter. While the typical hourly fee falls within a range, parents should consider the number of children, their ages and the expectations of the babysitter before determining their rate.

“I think it depends on the family,” said Denise Mancheski, enrichment director at the Greater Green Bay YMCA. “It varies. It isn’t like years ago when every parent paid $2 an hour.”

She shares some parents start at minimum wage, which is currently $7.25 per hour in Wisconsin.

Duffek has done some research and determined the minimum going rate for a Red Cross certified babysitter is currently $5 an hour, although some parents pay as much as $10

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