Red Cross Campaign To Reduce Home Fire Deaths and Injuries Begins in Kaukauna

Efforts will include installing smoke alarms and urging people to practice fire escape plans

10710893_10152718411990071_1668250310886687572_nRecently, the American Red Cross announced a new campaign throughout Wisconsin and across the country to reduce deaths and injuries from home fires by as much as 25 percent over the next five years. Two days in December, teams will visit 500 homes in Kaukauna to install smoke alarms and provide fire safety tips and review escape plans with residents.

Seven times a day someone in this country dies in a fire. The Red Cross campaign focuses on joining fire departments and community groups nationwide to install smoke alarms in communities with high numbers of fires and encouraging everyone to practice their fire escape plans.

The Red Cross also is asking every household in America to take the two simple steps that can save lives: checking their existing smoke alarms and practicing fire drills at home.

The door-to-door outreach team includes Red Cross volunteers & staff, the Kaukauna Fire Department, Volunteer Center of East Central WI, Outagamie County CERT and Team Rubicon.  

  • Sunday, December 7th 9:00am – Canvas targeted neighborhood with door hangers in advance so residents know we are returning the following Saturday with smoke alarms and information.
  • Saturday, December 13th 8:30am-12:00pm – Smoke Detector Installation

On both dates, we will meet at the Kaukauna Fire Department on 206 W. 3rd Street. We will create teams, distribute supplies and then go door-to-door.

Teams will be partnered with local fire departments to install smoke alarms in homes that need them and teach people about what they can do now to be prepared should a fire break out in their home because working smoke alarms cuts the risk of someone dying from a home fire in half.

Simple Steps to Save Lives

Even as the Red Cross and other groups install smoke alarms in some neighborhoods, they are calling on everyone to take two simple steps that can save lives: check their existing smoke alarms and practice fire drills at home,

There are several things families and individuals can do to increase their chances of surviving a fire:

  • If someone doesn’t have smoke alarms, install them. At a minimum, put one on every level of the home, inside bedrooms and outside sleeping areas. Local building codes vary and there may be additional requirements where someone lives.
  • If someone does have alarms, test them today. If they don’t work, replace them.
  • Make sure that everyone in the family knows how to get out of every room and how to get out of the home in less than two minutes.
  • Practice that plan. What’s the household’s escape time?

fire stat 3

New Poll Shows Many People Have False Sense of Security about Fire Safety

The Red Cross fire preparedness campaign comes at a time when a new national survey shows many Americans have a false sense of security about surviving a fire. The survey, conducted for the Red Cross, shows that people mistakenly believe they have more time than they really do to escape a burning home.

Fire experts agree that people may have as little as two minutes to escape a burning home before it’s too late to get out. But most Americans (62 percent) mistakenly believe they have at least five minutes to escape. Nearly one in five (18 percent) believe they have ten minutes or more.

When asked about their confidence levels in actually escaping a burning home, roughly four in 10 of those polled (42 percent) believed they could get out in two minutes.

While 69 percent of parents believe their children would know what to do or how to escape with little help, the survey found that many families had not taken necessary steps to support that level of confidence.

  • Less than one in five of families with children age 3-17 (18 percent) report that they’ve actually practiced home fire drills.
  • Less than half of parents (48 percent) have talked to their families about fire safety.
  • Only one third of families with children (30 percent) have identified a safe place to meet outside their home.

The Red Cross responds to nearly 70,000 disasters each year in the United States and the vast majority of those are home fires. Throughout Wisconsin, the Red Cross responded to more than 900 residential fires last year. You can help people affected by disasters like home fires and countless other crises by making a donation to support American Red Cross Disaster Relief. Your gift enables the Red Cross to prepare for, respond to and help people recover from disasters big and small. Visit redcross.org, call 1-800-RED CROSS or text the REDCROSS to 90999 to make a $10 donation.

The national public opinion survey was conducted for the Red Cross July 17-20, 2014 using ORC International’s Online CARAVAN omnibus survey. The study was conducted among a national sample of 1,130 American adults, including 311 parents of children aged 3-17. The total sample is balanced to be representative of the US adult population in terms of age, sex, geographic region, race and education.  The margin of error for the total sample of 1,130 adults is +/- 2.92 percent. The margin of error for the sample of 311 parents is +/- 5.56 percent.

Red Cross helping with emergency housing, food and clothing needs

Fire from 15th Avenue in Green Bay. (photo from http://fox11online.com)

Fire from 15th Avenue in Green Bay. (photo from http://fox11online.com)

The American Red Cross is helping a dozen people – nine adults and three children from four families – after  fires yesterday in (W. Winnebago) Appleton, (Happy Valley Drive) Menasha, (5th Avenue) Green Bay and (N. Ostranda Lane) Crivitz. The Red Cross is meeting with and providing appropriate help for emergency housing, food and clothing needs.

The Red Cross has also provided families with emergency lodging, sweatsuits and personal hygiene kits along with professional resources during this difficult situation. Financial assistance for clothing, food, winter garments and shoes was also provided. Red Cross team members will be available to help the families moving forward from the initial disaster response through recovery.

American Red Cross disaster assistance is free of charge, a gift made possible by generous donations and the work of trained volunteers.

To learn more about the American Red Cross or to make a financial gift please call, text or click. Call 1-800-RED-CROSS, text the word REDCROSS to 90999 to make a $10 donation or click on www.redcross.org

American Red Cross Celebration of Support Honors Announced

The local American Red Cross honored volunteers and community partners at the Celebration of Support event Thursday, November 6, 2014. Around 100 Red Cross volunteers and community supporters attended the event hosted by The Waters and sponsored by Festival Foods.

Joining Steve Hansen, Chapter Executive was community members from several cities. The Northeast Wisconsin Chapter covers 20 counties and the diversity of skills; experience and proximity are recognized in the awards below.

(l-r) NIck Cluppert, Disaster Program Manager, Tom Powell, Mental Health Disaster Volunteer, Steve Hansen, Chapter Executive.

(l-r) Nick Cluppert, Disaster Program Manager, Tom Powell, Mental Health Disaster Volunteer, Steve Hansen, Chapter Executive.

Thomas Powell, of Ripon, Victor Fousek Emergency Services Award for outstanding commitment assisting local and national communities impacted by disasters.

Norman “Gene” Wallis, of Appleton, Outreach Award presented to a volunteer for exceptional support in Health and Safety, Services to Armed Forces, or other areas that involve education and outreach promoting Red Cross services.

Nancy Hammock, of Fond du Lac, Blood Services Volunteer Award for exceptional reliability and dedication to the blood services program.

Janet Meyer, of Hortonville, Behind-the-Scenes Award presented to a volunteer who assists with essential office work at our (Appleton) office locations in development, facilities, reception and other behind-the-scenes jobs.

Angie Dusenberry, of Oshkosh, Rookie of the Year, presented to a volunteer for exceptional level of service who has started within the past year.

Traded Treasures, in Ripon, and ADOVCAP, in Oshkosh, Corporate Benefactor Award, for a business with outstanding commitment to their communities and collaboration with the American Red Cross.

(L-R) Pat Exarhos, Board Member and Steve Hansen, Chapter Executive.

(L-R) Pat Exarhos, Board Member and Steve Hansen, Chapter Executive.

Pat Exarhos, of Appleton, Leadership Award, presented to a member of the volunteer board of directors, committee or program for exceptional leadership, contribution and support for the advancement of the American Red Cross.

Charles Patzer, of Wild Rose, Volunteer of the Year Award, presented to the individual who has demonstrated excellence and long-term commitment to the American Red Cross. This individual gives time, talent and knowledge in ways that improve the quality of the programs and services of the organization.

Howard Porter, of Appleton, Clara Barton Award, presented to an individual who exemplifies the qualities of American Red Cross pioneer Clara Barton.

(l-r) NIck Cluppert, Disaster Program Manager, Charles Patzer, Disaster & Services to Armed Forces Volunteer, Steve Hansen, Chapter Executive.

(l-r) NIck Cluppert, Disaster Program Manager, Charles Patzer, Disaster & Services to Armed Forces Volunteer, Steve Hansen, Chapter Executive.

All award recipient photos are posted on our local Facebook page and Flickr site.

Special Thanks to Our Volunteers, Employees and Donors During Sandy

By: Trevor Riggen, Vice President of Disaster Services Operations and Logistics, American Red Cross

hurricane-sandy09Today marks the two-year anniversary of one of the largest responses in the long and proud history of this organization. It was a storm and challenge so unique that they had to come up with a new name just to describe it – Superstorm Sandy.  It was a massive, powerful storm that hit the most densely populated area of the country at the tail end of hurricane season followed by falling temperatures, snow, and enormous need throughout the region.

I want to begin by saying thank you to each and every one of you who donated money or raised your hand to join in serving those in need during the long weeks that followed landfall and to the thousands more who have served in our ongoing recovery efforts. So much great work was done by so many – the numbers are truly staggering.

  • More than 17 million meals and snacks were served
  • More than 7 million relief items were distributed
  • 74,000 over-night shelter stays were accommodated
  • More than 5,100 households have been provided over $32 million of move-in assistance
  • More than $91 million has been provided to dozens of nonprofits with specialized expertise and strong local ties

During the peak of the response and for weeks after Sandy’s landfall, we were providing 130,000 to 150,000 meals and snacks a day. Imagine handing a meal or snack to every person at a sold-out New York Giants or Jets game AND a sold-out Yankees game, every day, from Halloween until after Christmas. None of this would have been possible without the hearts of our volunteers and the generosity of our donors.

sandy-pie-chartMore than 17,000 of you put on a vest and put your lives on hold to serve others. Many of you stayed to serve past your 3 week commitment or returned to serve during the holidays. Your work has greatly benefited those affected by Sandy, not just in the initial response, but also through our recovery efforts, which continue to this day. Across New Jersey, New York and Connecticut the work goes on.  With our partners and the local regions we continue to serve those affected, through grant-funded home rebuilds, volunteer trainings and convening long-term recovery groups.  And our surveys show an overwhelming majority of those we served reported a positive experience with the Red Cross.

While we are proud of our response, we also know that we can always do better. “Good enough” is not the standard we seek to reach. We’re always striving to improve because we know the American public and the people we serve expect nothing less.

Throughout its 133-year history, the American Red Cross has continued to make changes and find new and more efficient ways to do things. In fact, this drive to learn and do better started with Clara Baron, the founder of the American Red Cross, who said, “I go for anything new that might improve the past.”

In that spirit, I want to close by sharing some of the improvements we’ve made based on what we learned from our work before, during and after Sandy.

Months before Sandy struck in October 2012, we began a process known as re-engineering. It began with a comprehensive and detailed examination of the way we approach disasters.

One of the main outcomes of that effort was a commitment to empower local Red Cross leaders on the ground, who know their communities best, to make more decisions locally. As a result of that commitment, we have moved nearly one-third of our disaster positions out of national headquarters and into the field, closer to the people we serve.

We are already seeing this new structure work. I’ve heard personally from those of you who served in Moore, Oklahoma after the tornadoes, Colorado after the floods, and Oso, Washington after the landslide.

If you look around at the major projects and work from the past year, you can see lessons from Sandy in many other places.

Preparedness: We saw during Sandy how critical preparedness is to response. Raising awareness of risks and preparedness actions at the community level can save lives in the first 48 to 72 hours after a storm.  Now we integrate preparedness into everything we do.

Response: The impact from Sandy was felt from Ohio and West Virginia to Vermont. This size of event allowed us to see where our systems could scale, as well as areas  where they couldn’t and we’ve made adjustments. Our new divisional structure and tools, such as our inventory management system, will allow us to streamline the movement of supplies and resources in a way we couldn’t before.

Recovery:  Perhaps the greatest lesson we learned was the value of having a standardized recovery program – one that is predictable and repeatable and that scales to meet the need.  You’ve probably seen the new Recovery Services program materials and resources; what’s currently available is just the start.

All this to say we’ve learned a great deal from Sandy and our many other operations over the past few years. We’re committed to taking the lessons we learn and applying them to the programs we create and the services we provide.

Last week, I was asked a very simple question by a reporter: “How would you characterize your response to Sandy?” My answer was equally simple – We couldn’t be prouder. We are proud of our efforts to help thousands of families move back into their homes. We are proud of the massive scale of feeding and distribution we provided. And, we are proud of the fact that we’ve spent or committed to spend 99 percent of the $311.5 million entrusted to us by our donors for our Sandy work.

Most importantly, we’re proud that when we put out the call for help, you answered, and it made a difference in the lives of others.

I am humbled to be a part of this amazing organization and to work each and every day alongside you to take care of those in need. We are committed to doing even better in the next disaster, and the one after that.

See more at: http://www.redcross.org/support/donating-fundraising/where-your-money-goes/sandy-response

Observe National Sickle Cell Awareness Month this September by donating blood with the American Red Cross

Help maintain a diverse blood supply to meet the needs of all patients

 

SicklecellMonth

 

The American Red Cross encourages eligible donors to help ensure a stable and diverse blood supply by giving blood in honor of National Sickle Cell Awareness Month this September.

Sickle cell disease is an inherited disease that causes red blood cells to form an abnormal crescent shape. It is estimated that sickle cell disease affects as many as 100,000 people in the U.S. Many of these patients face a lifetime of blood transfusions to help reduce the risk of stroke, damage to major organs and other complications that can arise as a result of sickle cell disease.

Since blood from donors of the same ethnic background as the recipient is less likely to cause complications, the Red Cross must maintain a diverse blood supply. This is particularly important for patients like those with sickle cell disease who may require regular blood transfusions.

To help increase donations during the month of September, those who come out to donate blood or platelets throughout the month will receive a coupon by email for a free haircut at participating Sport Clips locations.

For more information or to make an appointment to donate blood, visit http://www.redcrossblood.org or call 1-800-RED CROSS (1-800-733-2767).

 

Upcoming blood donation opportunities:

Brown County

  • Sept. 2 from 1-6 p.m. at American Red Cross, 2131 Deckner Ave. in Green Bay, Wis.
  • Sept. 2 from 6:30-11:30 a.m. at Bellin Hospital, 744 S. Webster in Green Bay, Wis.
  • Sept. 3 from 12:30-5:30 p.m. at St. Paul Catholic Church, 437 Main St. in Wrightstown, Wis.
  • Sept. 4 from 1-6 p.m. at American Red Cross, 2131 Deckner Ave. in Green Bay, Wis.
  • Sept. 5 from 7:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. at Pilgrim Congregational Church, 991 Pilgrim Way in Green Bay, Wis.
  • Sept. 5 from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. at American Red Cross, 2131 Deckner Ave. in Green Bay, Wis.
  • Sept. 5 from 12-5 p.m. at Odd Fellows Building, 1144 Radisson St. in Green Bay, Wis.
  • Sept. 6 from 8 a.m. to 12 p.m. at American Red Cross, 2131 Deckner Ave. in Green Bay, Wis.
  • Sept. 8 from 1-6 p.m. at American Red Cross, 2131 Deckner Ave. in Green Bay, Wis.
  • Sept. 8 from 12-5 p.m. at Resurrection Church, 333 Hilltop Road in Green Bay, Wis.
  • Sept. 9 from 1-6 p.m. at American Red Cross, 2131 Deckner Ave. in Green Bay, Wis.
  • Sept. 9 from 1-6 p.m. at Faith Lutheran Church, 2335 S. Webster Ave. in Green Bay, Wis.
  • Sept. 11 from 1-6 p.m. at American Red Cross, 2131 Deckner Ave. in Green Bay, Wis.
  • Sept. 11 from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at University of Wisconsin Green Bay Student Union, 2420 Nicolet Drive in Green Bay, Wis.
  • Sept. 12 from 7:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. at Pilgrim Congregational Church, 991 Pilgrim Way in Green Bay, Wis.
  • Sept. 12 from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. at American Red Cross, 2131 Deckner Ave. in Green Bay, Wis.
  • Sept. 13 from 8 a.m. to 12 p.m. at American Red Cross, 2131 Deckner Ave. in Green Bay, Wis.
  • Sept. 15 from 1-6 p.m. at American Red Cross, 2131 Deckner Ave. in Green Bay, Wis.

Kewaunee County

  • Sept. 15 from 1-6 p.m. at St John Lutheran Church, 700 Heritage Road in Luxemburg, Wis.

Marinette County

  • Sept. 8 from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Pine Tree Mall, 2800 Roosevelt Road in Marinette, Wis.

Oconto County

  • Sept. 4 from 11:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. at Mount Olive Lutheran Church, 206 N. Burk in Suring, Wis.

How to donate blood

 

Simply call 1-800-RED CROSS (1-800-733-2767) or visit redcrossblood.org to make an appointment or for more information. All blood types are needed to ensure a reliable supply for patients. A blood donor card or driver’s license or two other forms of identification are required at check-in. Individuals who are 17 years of age (16 with parental consent in some states), weigh at least 110 pounds and are in generally good health may be eligible to donate blood. High school students and other donors 18 years of age and younger also have to meet certain height and weight requirements.

 

American Red Cross Honors Volunteers and Supporters at Celebration of Support Event

The American Red Cross of Northeast Wisconsin Chapter celebrated its partners at the annual Celebration of Support Event on Tuesday, June 24 at the Riverside Ballroom in Green Bay. Two hundred and sixty attended the event, comprised of Red Cross volunteers, community partners and The Grainger Foundation representatives; the event sponsor. The crowd was brought to their feet upon hearing the amazing acts of volunteerism and collaboration. WBAY-TV anchor, Kathryn Bracho served as the Mistress of Ceremonies.

The program kicked-off with incoming Board Vice-chair, Chris Vanderheyden of Double Digit Sales Growth, welcoming words and appreciation for all who give of their time, talent and treasure to help the Red Cross fulfill its mission. Following Vanderheyden was Greg Novinska, CEO, Badger-Hawkeye Blood Services Region with an update on our collection, testing and distribution of life-saving blood products.  The first awards were presented to One-a-Week Club businesses and clubs who committed to at least 52 donations of blood per year, or one per week during the previous year.

After dinner, the Volunteer Recognition Awards were presented to individuals and groups for their exceptional volunteer work.

Jean Frisch, of Wisconsin Public Service, Ed McHugh Worker of the Year award for front-line volunteers with exceptional reliability to the blood program.

(l-r)  Greg Novinska, CEO, Badger-Hawkeye Blood Service Regioin, Robert Hollenbeck, Hilary Lesperance Award Winner, and his daughter, Lori Hollenbeck

(l-r) Greg Novinska, CEO, Badger-Hawkeye Blood Service Region, Robert Hollenbeck, Hilary Lesperance Award Winner, and his daughter, Lori Hollenbeck

Associated Bank, Business, Group or Organization of the Year, given to a business or group of volunteers for years of commitment to the American Red Cross Blood Services program.

Robert Hollenback, of Sheboygan Falls, Hilary Lesperance Award for outstanding support in the Blood Services Program.

Territory Three Disaster Action Team,  Kerrie Forester Emergency Services Award for commitment and dedication to Disaster Services.

John Mueller, of DePere, Andrew Janssen Transportation Award, for outstanding work in transportation services for the American Red Cross and providing transportation for the elderly population and those with disabilities to help them sustain an independent lifestyle.

Rick Jerry, of Green Bay, Outreach Award, for outstanding service in Preparedness, Health and Safety, education and outreach.

Sharon Davister, of Green Bay& Bonnie Rozmarynowski, of Denmark, Behind-the-Scenes Award presented to a volunteer who assists with essential office work at one of our office locations in development, facilities, reception and other behind-the-scenes jobs.

Pakou Lee, of Green Bay, Rookie of the Year, presented to a volunteer for exceptional level of service and has started within the past year.

The Konop Company, of Green Bay, Community Partnership Award, awarded to a group, individual, or business for demonstrating extraordinary support, collaboration and fulfillment of the American Red Cross mission within its core lines of service

Schneider, Corporate Benefactor Award, for a business with outstanding commitment and dedication to the American Red Cross.

Aymee Balison, of De Pere, Mrs. Crane (Mary) Murphy Award, presented to a member of the Board of Directors for exceptional contribution and advancement of the American Red Cross.

John and Lynne Wilson, of Iron Mountain, MI, Volunteer of the Year Award, presented to the individual who has demonstrated long-term commitment to multiple programs of the American Red Cross.

(l-r) Shawn Kiser, Major Gifts Officer, Jody Weyers, Director of Volunteers, Jim Rivett, Clara Barton Award Winner, and Mary Gronnert, Foundation Manager, Schneider, Corporate Benefactor Award.

(l-r) Shawn Kiser, Major Gifts Officer, Jody Weyers, Director of Volunteers, Jim Rivett, Clara Barton Award Winner, and Mary Gronnert, Foundation Manager, Schneider, Corporate Benefactor Award.

James Rivett, of Green Bay, President of Arketype, Clara Barton Award, the highest award of the night, presented to an individual who exemplifies the qualities of American Red Cross pioneer Clara Barton.

Congratulations to all the award recipients and thank you to everyone for your time, blood and support of the American Red Cross.

Click HERE to see pictures of all the award recipients.

‘Lean on Me’

By Barbara Behling, Communications Officer, American Red Cross  

Major General Dunbar shares his appreciation with Red Cross volunteers. We provided beverage, tissues and even diapers to attendees.

Major General Dunbar shares his appreciation with Red Cross volunteers. We provided beverage, tissues and even diapers to attendees.

April 2, 2014 –  It was an honor to represent the American Red Cross at the Troop Send-off ceremony for the Wisconsin Army National Guard – 121st Field Artillery Alpha Battery Unit .  For 79 brave men it was their next step before hitting the ground at Fort Bliss and then shipping off to Afghanistan.

The air inside the 128th Air National Guard Refueling Wing was still. The faces of grandparents were stoic as their grandsons “go off to war” as one gentlemen shared with me. “I’m now back to changing diapers to help the family.”  Many times the wives of soldiers rocked one baby on their chest while holding their spouse tight while another child hung onto their legs.

The ceremony was poignant with a military band playing and the dignitaries standing in front of the largest American flag I have ever witnessed.  Major General Dunbar spoke from the heart, “It’s a bittersweet day to send soldiers into combat zones for a year. What happens at home continues. Take the pride in your eyes, the confidence in each other and lean on each other”

The American Red Cross is proud to support our active duty members and their families around the clock – around the globe. Each member of this unit has received special  briefings on what to do and who to call in case of emergencies. The American Red Cross will answer the call.

Any military member and their family can “lean on us”  by contacting their local Red Cross office or by calling 877-272-7337 for support.

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